How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Find the area & perimeter of triangles & squares

When you are figuring the area of a square, you only need to know the height and width of the shape. Once you know the height and width, multiply them to get the area of the square. To find the perimeter of the square, add all four sides together. To find the area of a triangle, multiply together two of the sides (not the hypotenuse) and then multiply that figure by 1/2. To find the perimeter of the triangle, add all three sides together.

How To: Learn Calculus in 20 minutes

Did you sleep all semester in your Calculus class? Are you just waking up now to realize you have a test on Monday and that you're totally screwed? Well, luckily you can learn an entire semester worth of Calculus in just twenty minutes... or at leasts that's the hope.

How To: Graph x & y intercepts on a TI-84 Plus calculator

In this video the teacher shows us how to use a TI-84 plus graphing calculator to graph a function, adjust the view window, and determine the values of several types of critical points on the graph such as x-intercept, y-intercept, local maximums, and local minimums. After entering the function in the Y= editor she presses the ZOOM button and selects Z-Standard this adjusts the view window to a range of -10 to 10 on both axis. To find each of the critical points requested the teacher uses the...

How To: Find the standard deviation with the Z-Score formula

In this tutorial, we learn how to find the standard deviation with the Z-Score formula. First, take your problem and write it out one by one underneath each other. Then, you will need to substitute the numbers in for the variables that are in the problem. Once you do this, you will follow the basic rules of math to find out what the answer to the problem is appropriately. Once you have done this, finish off the problem to find the answer, then you will have found the standard deviation using ...

How To: Simplify fourth roots

In this video the instructor shows how to find out the fourth roots of a number. The properties of fourth root says that for any positive number of a, its fourth roots are real. And for any negative value a, its fourth roots are not real. So split the number inside the fourth root as the product of two perfect squares and then cancel out the power with the fourth root giving its roots. As the fourth roots of a positive number are real, the answer you get is correct. But you cannot find out th...

How To: Graph half an ellipse

If you are given an equation of ellipse in the form of a function whose value is a square root, you may need to simplify it to make it look like the equation of an ellipse. Now equate the function to a variable y and perform squaring on both sides to remove the radical. Now simplify the equation and get it in the form of (x*x)/(a*a) + (y*y)/(b*b) = 1 which is the general form of an ellipse. Now you will have the x and y intercepts which are a and b respectively. Using this values graph the eq...

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Figure out the domain & range of a piecewise function

Need to calculate the domain and range of a graphed piecewise function? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Calculate the area of a parallelogram

Calculating The Area Of A Parallelogram A parallelogram is a 4-sided shape formed by two pairs of parallel lines. Opposite sides are equal in length and opposite angles are equal in measure. To find the area of a parallelogram, multiply the base by the height. The formula is:

How To: Find a slope of a straight line with: Ax + By + C = 0

In this video the instructor shows how to find the slope of an equation which is in the form Ax + By + C = 0. He says that the formula to find the slope of a line in the above form is slope m = -A/B, where A and B are the numeric constants of the variables x and y in the given equation. He goes on and further shows how to do this with a couple of examples. He shows how to reduce any equation into the general form and how to apply the slope formula then. This video shows how to find the slope ...

How To: Find the slope of a line given 2 points with fractions

In this video tutorial the instructor shows how to find the slope of a line given two points with fractional values. To do this first name your two points as point 1 with coordinates as x1, y1 and point 2 with coordinates x2, y2. Then substitute the values in the equation of the slope which is slope m = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1). Now all you have to do is simply the fraction after substituting the point values. Be careful about the signs while substituting in the formula. Now finally after solvin...

How To: Find extra points for a parabola (quadractic equation)

This is a mathematical educational video on how to find extra points for a parabola. In the first two examples there is no need for finding extra points as they have five points and have zeros of the parabola. In example 3 we need to find extra points. The equation is y=4xsquare-4x+4. You can take x= -1 and get the value for y. You will get a point now. Similarly you can substitute -2 for x in the same equation and get the value for y. Now you get another point. Now you can draw the parabola.

How To: Find the area of a circle when you know the diameter

In this video, it is shown how to calculate the area of a circle where the diameter is given. The formula for calculating the area of a circle is pi multiplied by square of radius. Radius is actually half of the diameter. In this video, the diameter is given as 10.6 meters. Hence, the radius will be half of 10.6 which is equal to 5.3 meters. Now, to find the area we shall multiply pi with the square of 5.3. Square of 5.3 is 28.09. If we multiply 28.09 with pi we shall get the area of the circ...

How To: Find the equation for a growth pattern

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to find an equation that describse the growth pattern of a sequence of blocks.

How To: Find the opposite and absolute value of a number

View the absolute value of a number as its distance from zero. When you take the absolute value of a number, you always end up with a positive number (or zero). Whether the input was positive or negative (or zero), the output is always positive (or zero). For instance, | 3 | = 3, and | _3 | = 3 also. This property that both the positive and the negative become positive makes solving absolute-value equations a little tricky. But once you learn the "trick", they're not so bad. Let's start with ...

How To: Solve percentages without a calculator

Want to know how to find percentages quickly without the use of a calculator? It's easy. This free video math lesson will show you how it's done. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just study for that next big test).

How To: Find X-bar with the Z-score formula

In this video tutorial it shows you how to find the x-bar by using the Z-score formula. In the beginning of this video the formula is displayed on the right, while the values that you need to plug in are on the left. Once you plug in the values and do the cross multiplying, all you have to do is get x-bar by itself on one side of the equation. This is a simple problem on using the z-score formula to find x-bar, it can help you solve more complex problems in the future.

How To: Calculate the height and volume of a pyramid

Need to know how to calculate the height and volume of a pyramid in geometry? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Simplify radicals which are not perfect squares

Need help reducing radical expressions without perfect square or cube roots? Take heart: this free math lesson will ensure that you know everything you need to know for that next big test. Examples include square roots, cube roots, and 4th roots. You'll also learn a technique to simplify n-root expressions as well as how to simplify variables in radical expressions.

How To: Calculate probability in "at least one" problems

Calculating probablities can be used to help us make decision. PatrickJMT explains how to calculate probability in an "either A or not A" scenario. The probability of A plus the probability of not A is equal to one. Therefore, the probability of A is equal to one minus the probability of not A ; P(A)= 1 - P(not A). The probability of a major earthquake in San Francisco over a period of time is used as an example. The probablity of an earthquake of a magnitude of 7.5 or greater in San Francisc...

How To: Translate a sentence into math symbols

We will be translating the sentence "twice y differs from 5 by more than two, “into a mathematical equation. The word twice generally means two times, so 2*y (because y comes next in the sentence). Differs normally means is different and a difference from something in a mathematical sentence means subtraction most of the time, thus minus five. We don't know if we’re talking about below 5 or above 5 on the number line, so we put absolute value around the equation. More than implies a greater t...

How To: Find percent by mass & percent composition

In chemistry you come across problems which ask you to find the percent by mass and percent composition of each element in a chemical compound. To do this the first step is to compute the molar mass. Use the periodic table to look up the mass of individual atoms and multiply it by the number of atoms to find the mass of that element. Now add up all the masses to arrive at the molar mass of the compound. Now to find the percent composition of an element divide the total mass of each element by...

How To: Graph a quadratic function in factored form

This video deals with solving quadratic functions. It does not involve the use of the quadratic equation; rather, only factored equations are used. The speaker starts out with a factored quadratic equation. The speaker goes on to do the mathematical steps necessary to find both the x and y intercepts of the quadratic function at hand. The author then continues on with the example to find the function's minimum. Next all of the points that have been solved for are plotted and the function is s...

How To: Use Heron's formula

Area of a triangle can be calculated when you have the length of its base and height. In this case the area is 1/2 times the base and its height. If you do not know the height of the triangle but know the lengths of all the sides of the triangle then you can calculate its area using the Herons formula. First to use it you need to computer the semi perimeter of the triangle S, which is S = (a + b + c)/2, where a, b, c are the lengths of the sides of the triangle. Now the area of the triangle i...

How To: Solve ratio problems in basic mathematics

Need help figuring out how to work with ratios? Look no further than this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn...

How To: Solve rounding problems in basic mathematics

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to unpack and solve problems requiring you to round whole numbers.

How To: Divide small numbers by big numbers

This is a mathematical educational video on how to divide a small number by a larger number. You are aware that it is easy to divide a larger number by a small number. For example, if you want to divide 379 by 9 it is easy to do so. But if you have to divide 9 by 379 it is a bit difficult. You have to add a zero and see if you can divide. You need to add one more zero so that you can divide 900 by 379. But you should know that the answer would start like this 0.0 as we have added 2 zeros alre...

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