How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Divide small numbers by big numbers

This is a mathematical educational video on how to divide a small number by a larger number. You are aware that it is easy to divide a larger number by a small number. For example, if you want to divide 379 by 9 it is easy to do so. But if you have to divide 9 by 379 it is a bit difficult. You have to add a zero and see if you can divide. You need to add one more zero so that you can divide 900 by 379. But you should know that the answer would start like this 0.0 as we have added 2 zeros alre...

How To: Find the area of a triangle when given 2 sides & angle

This video shows you how to easily find the area of a triangle when you know the length of 2 sides and the angle between them. The first thing you have to do is mark the sides of the triangle by a, b, c, where a is the side between A and B, b is the side between B and C and c is the side between C and A. If you know 2 of these 3 sides an you know the angle between them you can find the area of the triangle very simple: Area= (a x b x sin c)/2, where a, b are the two sides and c is the angle b...

How To: Write a slope-intercept equation given an X-Y table

In this tutorial the author shows how to derive a slope-intercept equation of a line given an X-Y table. He explains that the general form of slope intercept form which is y = m*x + b. Now he intends to find value of slope, i.e. m first. Now slope is change in y over change in x. He computes the slope using the X-Y values from the table. Next he substitutes a pair of x, y value in the equation to compute the value of y intercept b. Now finally substituting the values in the equation the slop-...

How To: Calculate math without a calculator

Before the calculator and even the abacus was invented, there was a little instrument called the human brain that we used to do math. Remember that? While most of us turn to our trusty Ti-84s to do calculus homework or whip out our cell phone calculators to determine how much we should tip at Johnny Rocket's, it can often be much faster to use our own brains, along with a piece of paper and pencil.

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Find a slope of a straight line with: Ax + By + C = 0

In this video the instructor shows how to find the slope of an equation which is in the form Ax + By + C = 0. He says that the formula to find the slope of a line in the above form is slope m = -A/B, where A and B are the numeric constants of the variables x and y in the given equation. He goes on and further shows how to do this with a couple of examples. He shows how to reduce any equation into the general form and how to apply the slope formula then. This video shows how to find the slope ...

How To: Learn Calculus in 20 minutes

Did you sleep all semester in your Calculus class? Are you just waking up now to realize you have a test on Monday and that you're totally screwed? Well, luckily you can learn an entire semester worth of Calculus in just twenty minutes... or at leasts that's the hope.

How To: Find the area & perimeter of triangles & squares

When you are figuring the area of a square, you only need to know the height and width of the shape. Once you know the height and width, multiply them to get the area of the square. To find the perimeter of the square, add all four sides together. To find the area of a triangle, multiply together two of the sides (not the hypotenuse) and then multiply that figure by 1/2. To find the perimeter of the triangle, add all three sides together.

How To: Find extra points for a parabola (quadractic equation)

This is a mathematical educational video on how to find extra points for a parabola. In the first two examples there is no need for finding extra points as they have five points and have zeros of the parabola. In example 3 we need to find extra points. The equation is y=4xsquare-4x+4. You can take x= -1 and get the value for y. You will get a point now. Similarly you can substitute -2 for x in the same equation and get the value for y. Now you get another point. Now you can draw the parabola.

How To: Find the 100th term in a sequence

Need to find the nth term in a given arithmetic sequence? See how it's done with this free video math lesson. Need help finding the From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's seri...

How To: Calculate the height and volume of a pyramid

Need to know how to calculate the height and volume of a pyramid in geometry? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Write a logarithm as a sum or difference of logarithms

This video shows the method to write a logarithm as a sum or difference of logarithms. The square root of the term given is taken out as half according to the rule. Then the numerator and denominator is divided into product of factors. This is broken into the difference of numerator and denominator according to the rule. Finally, the product of factors is expressed as the sum of factors. Now we see the domain of the term. As the term is a square root of the term it should be greater than zero...

How To: Find the coordinate of a point

In this video the author shows how to plot a point on the coordinate plane. He explains about the coordinate plane and shows how to read and write points to it with an example. He says that any point on the coordinate plane has an x, y- coordinate values. He says that for any point its projection on the x-axis is its x-coordinate and the points projection on y-axis is its y-coordinate. He shows how to find this out for a sample value and plots the coordinates of it. In this video the author u...

How To: Calculate acceleration of a car

This video teaches how to calculate the acceleration of a car. The information for this calculation is for a car that accelerates by 12 meters per second in a time of 3 seconds. So to calculate acceleration use the following formula: acceleration equals change of speed divided by time. So, using the information provided for this calculation, acceleration equals 12 meters per second divided by a time of 3 seconds. So this gives an acceleration of 4 meters per second squared.

How To: Find the area of a circle when you know the diameter

In this video, it is shown how to calculate the area of a circle where the diameter is given. The formula for calculating the area of a circle is pi multiplied by square of radius. Radius is actually half of the diameter. In this video, the diameter is given as 10.6 meters. Hence, the radius will be half of 10.6 which is equal to 5.3 meters. Now, to find the area we shall multiply pi with the square of 5.3. Square of 5.3 is 28.09. If we multiply 28.09 with pi we shall get the area of the circ...

How To: Do long division with decimals

Video Nerd thinks that when your doing long division with decimals you should first take out the decimal. Write the number as if it didn't have a decimal. For example if the problem was 12.5 divided by 5 then you will just use 125 and divide that by 5. Next divide the first digit of the dividend by the divisor an write the number up top. Next you multiply, after your done multiplying the numbers subtract, and when your done subtracting the numbers drop the reaming numbers in the dividend down...

How To: Find a missing part of a triangle, similar to another

In this tutorial the author shows how to find out the missing part of a triangle that is similar to another triangle. He explains the concept of similar triangle diagrammatically by showing that similar triangles have similar angles and parallel sides. Now he labels sides of similar triangles and marks the value of unknown side as variable x. Now in similar triangles as the lengths of sides of proportionate he shows how to write a equation of proportion and solves it finding the missing part ...

How To: Find the equation of an ellipse given a graph

Notes College Algebra teaches you how to find the equation of an ellipse given a graph. You first want to find out the center of the ellipse, which in the video is (2, -3). The major axis is parallel to the X axis. The equation is (x - h) squared/a squared plus (y - k) squared/a squared equals 1. A is the distance from the center to either of the vertices, which is 5 over here. B is the distance from the center to the top or bottom of the ellipse, which is 3. You then use these values to find...

How To: Find a slope of a line parallel/perpendicular to it

This video tells you how to find a slope of a parallel / perpendicular to it. In the equation y = mx + c, m is the slope. To calculate the slope of a line that is parallel to another line, you have to consider the rule m1 = m2 which means slope of the first line m1 is equal to the second line m2, if both the lines are parallel. Take the equation y = 2/3x - 7.2/3 is the slope. According to the rule m1 = 2/3 and so m2 = 2/3.Now to calculate the slope of perpendicular line you have another rule ...

How To: Solve for ratios and proportions

In this tutorial the instructor shows how to solve ratios and proportions. He gives a two step approach to solve an equality of two fractions in which the value of a variable in unknown. He says that in the first step we should cross multiply the numbers across the diagonal. In the second step we need to divide and simplify to get the value of the unknown variable. This video gives a simple two step method on how to solve ratios and proportions.

How To: Factor trinomials with the "swing method"

This is a very interesting educational video on how to find the factor trinomials using the swing method. Let us take an example and find the factor trinomials for 2xsquare-13x-45. Let us use the swing method. So now we will get 2xsquare -13x-45. You have to find the suitable factors of 90. It is 18 and 5. If you multiply 18 by 5 you will get 90. You will get (x-18over2)(x+5over2). The final answer is (x-9)(2x+5). Now we have found out the factor trinomials of 2xsquare-13x-45. This swing meth...

How To: Find the area of a triangle given three points

In this tutorial, we learn how to find the area of a triangle given three points. First, you will need to plot the points on a graph. After this, find the base and the height using the graph. Next substitute into area of a triangle formula and then evaluate. When you finally find the area of the triangle, then you will write down the answer ending it with the units. This is a simple way to find the area of the triangle, you just have to make sure you count correctly and have calculated the ar...

How To: Find the common ratio of a geometric series

Interested in knowing how to find the ratio of a geometric series? See how it's done with this free geometer's guide. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Evaluate a telescoping series using partial fractions

Looking for a primer on how to solve a telescoping series using partial fractions? See how it's done with this free video college algebra lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Divide proper fractions

This video shows you how to easily divide proper fractions. In the first step, you have to calculate how many times does the denominator fit into the numerator. You need to divide the numerator by the denominator. If the denominator does not fit into the numerator, you have to write 0, followed with a point, at the top of the calculation ("0."). Next, you add a 0 next to the numerator (multiply it by 10). Now, you have to calculate how many times does the denominator fit into the numerator ag...

How To: Divide a whole number by a proper fraction in math

Want to know how to divide a whole number by a proper fraction in basic arithmetic? Learn how it's done with this free video math lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Solve word problems in trigonometry

Need help figuring out how to unpack and solve word problems in trig? Learn how with this free video trigonometry lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free...

How To: Figure out circumference with given radius

Here Mr Misonet tries to teach to compute circumference of a circle when radius is given. First he convince you the formula. The circumference of a circle is proportionately equals to "pie" times of its diameter,where the value of "pie" is equal to 3.14 and diameter is equal to two times radius. Then he puts the value of the diameter of the given circle and calculate the value of the circumference and also make you understand how to multiply the numbers with decimals. And lastly he makes your...

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Find a number given Its percent

This how-to video is about how to find a number when its percent is given. This video is really helpful and effective in finding the number when the percent is given, the following steps are explained in the video to find the number when its percent is given:

How To: Figure out the domain & range of a piecewise function

Need to calculate the domain and range of a graphed piecewise function? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

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