How To: Remember "greater than" & "less than" symbols

This video shows you how to easily remember "greater than" and "less than" math symbols. The first thing you have to remember is that "less than" symbol looks like the letter L ("less than" symbol is "<"). When you see this sign, remember that < looks like L and means "less than". The other symbol, "greater than" does not look like the letter L, therefore it cannot be "less than" and it's easier to remember. The "greater than" symbol is ">". That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Use ">" (greater than) and "<" (less than) symbols

In this video the author explains how to identify the less than (<) and greater than (>) symbols and when to use them. She explains to us to relate the numbers to animals stating that the smaller numbers are smaller animals and bigger numbers are bigger animals. Now she tells us to imagine that smaller animals are eaten up by the larger animals. So she shows a smaller number comes on the left side of '<' sign and bigger number comes on the right side of '<' sign stating that the bigger number...

How To: Find the area of a triangle when given 2 sides & angle

This video shows you how to easily find the area of a triangle when you know the length of 2 sides and the angle between them. The first thing you have to do is mark the sides of the triangle by a, b, c, where a is the side between A and B, b is the side between B and C and c is the side between C and A. If you know 2 of these 3 sides an you know the angle between them you can find the area of the triangle very simple: Area= (a x b x sin c)/2, where a, b are the two sides and c is the angle b...

How To: Write a slope-intercept equation given an X-Y table

In this tutorial the author shows how to derive a slope-intercept equation of a line given an X-Y table. He explains that the general form of slope intercept form which is y = m*x + b. Now he intends to find value of slope, i.e. m first. Now slope is change in y over change in x. He computes the slope using the X-Y values from the table. Next he substitutes a pair of x, y value in the equation to compute the value of y intercept b. Now finally substituting the values in the equation the slop-...

How To: Solve problems involving deductive reasoning

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to unpack and solve word problems that require you to apply deductive reasoning.

How To: Find the slope of a line given 2 points with fractions

In this video tutorial the instructor shows how to find the slope of a line given two points with fractional values. To do this first name your two points as point 1 with coordinates as x1, y1 and point 2 with coordinates x2, y2. Then substitute the values in the equation of the slope which is slope m = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1). Now all you have to do is simply the fraction after substituting the point values. Be careful about the signs while substituting in the formula. Now finally after solvin...

How To: Figure out the domain & range of a piecewise function

Need to calculate the domain and range of a graphed piecewise function? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Find a slope of a straight line with: Ax + By + C = 0

In this video the instructor shows how to find the slope of an equation which is in the form Ax + By + C = 0. He says that the formula to find the slope of a line in the above form is slope m = -A/B, where A and B are the numeric constants of the variables x and y in the given equation. He goes on and further shows how to do this with a couple of examples. He shows how to reduce any equation into the general form and how to apply the slope formula then. This video shows how to find the slope ...

How To: Find the area of a parallelogram using geometry

The video shows us how to find the area of parallelogram using geometry. Here in this video it is done by using an example where the parallelogram is given ABCD. The area of the parallelogram is base times height (bh). Here the base is given as 15 but the height is not known but it is represented by the segment BD. To find the value of h, let’s use right triangle BDC on the right side of the figure. Since base is 15 and the opposite side of the parallelogram is congruent, the hypotenuse of th...

How To: Find the value of a variable in an algebraic equation

Need help figuring out how to solve simple algebraic equations? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Find the vertices of a polygon of constraints

In this tutorial the instructor shows how to find the vertices of a polygon of constraints. In any optimization problem after defining your polygon you need to find its vertices. First you will have a set of equations which represents the constraints in your problem. Now you have to find the coordinates of the vertex of it by solving the optimization problem. To do that you have to start with a point and check the lines that are passing through it. Now take those lines and solve them for the ...

How To: Compute a square root using the geometric method

With mathematics, as with anything else, not everyone progresses at the same rate. Happily, in the age of Internet video tutorials, this isn't a problem. Those who progress quickly can go beyond what's being taught them and those who are struggling likewise have all the time in the world to catch up. With this free video math lesson, you'll learn how to calculate the value of a square using using geometry.

How To: Solve a 3x3 linear system using Cramer's Rule

In this video the instructor shows how to solve a 3 x 3 linear system using the Cramer's rule. In this kind of problem you are given three equations in three variables x, y, z and you need to solve for the values of these equations. You can solve this using the Cramer rule which says that the value of x is Dx/D, where Dx and D are two different determinate. Now you have to figure out the determinate to get the value of variable x. The determinate D is called the foundation determinate and is ...

How To: Do long division without a calculator

This video shows you step by step how to do long division without the use of a calculator. The video shows viewers two different ways to solve a division problem. It first shows how to do the problem the traditional way, then it shows how to do it according to the long division process. The long division process is where you write the whole division, multiplication, and subtraction process out showing all your work. Long division is mainly used when dividing large numbers. There are three com...

How To: Find a missing side of a triangle, similar to another

In this tutorial the author shows how to find out the missing side of a triangle which is similar to an other triangle. He explains the concept of similar triangle using diagrams and by showing that similar triangles have equal corresponding angles and parallel sides. Now he labels sides of similar triangles and intends to find out the length of unknown side. Now in similar triangles, as the lengths of sides are proportionate he shows how to write a equation of proportion and solve it finding...

How To: Find extra points for a parabola (quadractic equation)

This is a mathematical educational video on how to find extra points for a parabola. In the first two examples there is no need for finding extra points as they have five points and have zeros of the parabola. In example 3 we need to find extra points. The equation is y=4xsquare-4x+4. You can take x= -1 and get the value for y. You will get a point now. Similarly you can substitute -2 for x in the same equation and get the value for y. Now you get another point. Now you can draw the parabola.

How To: Find the area of a circle when you know the diameter

In this video, it is shown how to calculate the area of a circle where the diameter is given. The formula for calculating the area of a circle is pi multiplied by square of radius. Radius is actually half of the diameter. In this video, the diameter is given as 10.6 meters. Hence, the radius will be half of 10.6 which is equal to 5.3 meters. Now, to find the area we shall multiply pi with the square of 5.3. Square of 5.3 is 28.09. If we multiply 28.09 with pi we shall get the area of the circ...

How To: Derive the area of a circle

This video is about deriving the area of a circle of radius 'r' using polar co-ordinate. First, we draw a circle and its radius 'r'. Then draw another radius close to it, so that it forms a small triangle-like figure. To find the area of the complete circle, divide the circle into similar small triangles. The area of each triangle is given by half the product of its perpendicular and the base. We give the angle between the two radii as d?. We get the area of the small triangle by substituting...

How To: Find the x & y intercepts of rational functions

In this tutorial the instructor shows how to find the x and y intercepts of rational functions. Finding the intercepts of a rational function is similar to finding the intercepts of other normal equations. You can find the x intercept of the equation by setting the value of y to zero and solving the equation. Similarly you can solve the y intercept by setting the value of x to zero and solving the equation. Now while solving this rational function for intercepts if you face a situation where ...

How To: Find the 100th term in a sequence

Need to find the nth term in a given arithmetic sequence? See how it's done with this free video math lesson. Need help finding the From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's seri...

How To: Complete a proof involving segments

This video from Yay Math! is a geometry lesson on how to complete a proof involving segments. He draws a line segment with four points labeled A, B, C and D. The problem is as follows: Given: AC is equivalent to BD. Prove that AB is equivalent to CD. The first statement of proof is the given. Next, you need to define the congruent segments and state that they're equal in measurement. Next, break down the segments: AC=AB+BC, and BD=BC+CD. This is called segment addition postulate. The end of t...

How To: Factor a trinomial with negative leading coefficient

In this video the instructor shows how to factor a trinomial with negative leading coefficient. Most of the students are confused when they have to factor a trinomial with a negative leading coefficient. But there are many ways to solve these kind of problems as shown in this video. One way you can do is that take out the greatest common factor (GCF) of -1 from the equation. So pulling the -1 gives you the original trinomial with all the signs of the terms changed. Now go on and factor the ne...

How To: Write a logarithm as a sum or difference of logarithms

This video shows the method to write a logarithm as a sum or difference of logarithms. The square root of the term given is taken out as half according to the rule. Then the numerator and denominator is divided into product of factors. This is broken into the difference of numerator and denominator according to the rule. Finally, the product of factors is expressed as the sum of factors. Now we see the domain of the term. As the term is a square root of the term it should be greater than zero...

How To: Evaluate square roots

This is the video about how to evaluate square roots. The square root of a number is a number that you can square to get it, that is, a number that you can multiply by itself to get the number. So, 2 is a square root of 4, because 2 x 2 = 4, and 3 is a square root of 9, because 3 x 2 = 9. (-2) x 2 is also 4 and (-3) x 2 is also 9. Numbers that have square roots always have two, a positive one and a negative one, but the square root symbol means only the positive one, so we can have one answer...

How To: Find the equation of a circle given: center & tangent

In this video, the instructor shows how to find the equation of a circle given its center point and a tangent line to it. To do this, take a graph and plot the given point and the tangent on that graph. Now, from the center of the circle, measure the perpendicular distance to the tangent line. This gives us the radius of the circle. Using the center point and the radius, you can find the equation of the circle using the general circle formula (x-h)*(x-h) + (y-k)*(y-k) = r*r, where (h,k) is th...

How To: Solve percentages without a calculator

Want to know how to find percentages quickly without the use of a calculator? It's easy. This free video math lesson will show you how it's done. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just study for that next big test).

How To: Convert fractions to percents in two steps

This video shows you how to easily convert fractions to percents. You can convert fractions to percents in 2 easy steps. The first step is multiplying the fraction by 100 (e.g.. your fraction is 3/5; 3/5 x 100 = 3/5 x 100/1 = 300/5). The second step is reducing the fraction, when possible (e.g.. 3/5 x 100/1 = 300/5 = 60). Don't forget to add the percent sign (%)(you obtained 60%). That's it! Good Luck!

How To: Find the slope from a set of points

To find the slope of a line you must have two points and then you must plug in the two points into the slope formula. The slope formula is m= y2-y1 over x2-x1. If the slope is a fraction be sure to reduce to the lowest. Remember if a number is divided into zero it is zero, if zero is divided into the number it is undefined. A calculator can help one remember this. Horizontal lines have slopes and vertical lines do not. Drawing the lines on a graph can help you see the actual slopes and which ...

How To: Simplify fourth roots

In this video the instructor shows how to find out the fourth roots of a number. The properties of fourth root says that for any positive number of a, its fourth roots are real. And for any negative value a, its fourth roots are not real. So split the number inside the fourth root as the product of two perfect squares and then cancel out the power with the fourth root giving its roots. As the fourth roots of a positive number are real, the answer you get is correct. But you cannot find out th...

How To: Evaluate combinations of functions from graphs

YouTube user NotesCollegeAlgebra teaches you how to evaluate combinations of functions from graphs. You start off with a graph and some functions. (f+g)(-3), (g/f)(0) and (fg)(-6). You start looking at the graph and the first line and you get (f+g)(-3)=f(-3)+g(-3)=3+1=4. (g/f)(0)=g(0)/f(0)=2/-3=-2/3. (fg)(-6)=f(-6)g(-6)=(-3). But then when you want to find out g(-6) you realize -6 is not in g's domain. So the answer to the last equation is that it doesn't exist.

How To: Calculate Type I (Type 1) errors in statistics

Need a quick primer on how to solve type-1 error problem in stats? Let this video be your guide. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. For all of the details, watch this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials.

How To: Prove a triangle inscribed in a circle is right angled

When a triangle is inserted in a circle in such a way that one of the side of the triangle is diameter of the circle then the triangle is right triangle. To prove this first draw the figure of a circle. Now draw a diameter to it. It can be any line passing through the center of the circle and touching the sides of it. Now making this as the side of a triangle draw two lines from the ends of the diameter to a point on the circle. Now join the center of the circle to the other vertex of the cir...

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