Hot Math Posts

How To: Find a percentage of a whole number in basic math

Need help figuring out how to find a given percentage of a whole number (e.g., 16% of 736)? Watch this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this free math tutorial, you'll learn how to find percentage values in basic arit...

How To: Solve percentages without a calculator

Want to know how to find percentages quickly without the use of a calculator? It's easy. This free video math lesson will show you how it's done. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just study for that next big test).

How To: Simplify fourth roots

In this video the instructor shows how to find out the fourth roots of a number. The properties of fourth root says that for any positive number of a, its fourth roots are real. And for any negative value a, its fourth roots are not real. So split the number inside the fourth root as the product of two perfect squares and then cancel out the power with the fourth root giving its roots. As the fourth roots of a positive number are real, the answer you get is correct. But you cannot find out th...

How To: Write a slope-intercept equation given an X-Y table

In this tutorial the author shows how to derive a slope-intercept equation of a line given an X-Y table. He explains that the general form of slope intercept form which is y = m*x + b. Now he intends to find value of slope, i.e. m first. Now slope is change in y over change in x. He computes the slope using the X-Y values from the table. Next he substitutes a pair of x, y value in the equation to compute the value of y intercept b. Now finally substituting the values in the equation the slop-...

How To: Find the perimeter & area of a complex figure

In this video tutorial the author shows how to find the perimeter and area of a complex figure. He shows that a complex figure can be subdivided into standard geometric figures. In the current example he divides the complex figure into a rectangle and a triangle. Now he computes the perimeter by adding the three sides of the rectangle and the two sides of the triangle. Similarly he computes the individual areas of the rectangle and the triangle and finally adds then up to find the area of the...

How To: Multiply proper & improper fractions

So, you need a little extra help in the fractions department? No problem. In this two-part vieo tutorial, learn how to multiply proper fractions and mixed numbers in part one. In part two, learn how to multiply mixed numbers & multiply sets of improper fractions.

How To: Solve a problem that asks you to identify percent, amount and base

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to solve simple percent problems in basic arithmetic.

How To: Solve for the missing ratios or proportions

In this video the tutor shows how to solve the missing ratios or proportions. He explains it with an example, where a number in one of the ratios is missing and he intends to find this value. He shows the example of cross multiplication, where you multiply the values on the either side of the equation diagonally and finally solves the equation which results in the value of the unknown value. This is an introductory video explaining how to use rations and proportions to find missing values.

How To: Be a human calculator

Before we had the calculator and before we had the abacus we had the human brain to complete our math problems for us. Remember that? Well, it seems that few of us do, resorting to calculators on our phone for elementary subtraction problems and multiplication.

How To: Find the area of irregular shapes

This video explains how to find the area of irregular shapes. Draw the shape on a grid or graph paper. This will help you divide your shape into pieces. Draw dotted lines to divide the shape into squares, rectangles or triangles. For instance, if you have an "L" shape, you can divide the shape into two rectangles. Be sure your shapes do not overlap. Calculate the area of each individual shape. The graph paper will help you determine the length and width of each shape. Add the resulting areas ...

How To: Isolate a variable

If you're struggling a bit with algebra, check out this video to learn how to isolate a variable. Isolating a variable is a matter of separating and simplifying.

How To: Use the ratio formula to find coordinates of a point

This video is recorded in a mathematics class room. It is very clear by the sound and picture. The faculty here is explaining that the ratio between two numbers can be found using various formulae and methods. For example, 3:1 is the ratio between p and q. Likewise he explained the other formulae and methods.

How To: Cancel out in basic algebra

This video gives you brief tutorial on simplifying expressions, or canceling out common factors. He starts out by answering the question "What is canceling?" and demonstrates a basic example. You find the greatest common factor between the numerator and denominator, which you then divide both by. This can also be done if you have variables in your fraction. He then shows it can be done the same way if you have binomials in your fractions. However, you must be careful that the denominator does...

How To: Factor a trinomial with negative leading coefficient

In this video the instructor shows how to factor a trinomial with negative leading coefficient. Most of the students are confused when they have to factor a trinomial with a negative leading coefficient. But there are many ways to solve these kind of problems as shown in this video. One way you can do is that take out the greatest common factor (GCF) of -1 from the equation. So pulling the -1 gives you the original trinomial with all the signs of the terms changed. Now go on and factor the ne...

How To: Simplify cube roots

In this video, the narrator presents the viewer with a quick, painless way of simplifying cube roots. The narrator presents many methods to simplify square roots to appeal to different learning styles. By doing things like dividing the power by the root to figure out the power of a number x, the viewer is better able to tackle square-rooting numbers that may not have friendly roots. The video gets more complex as it goes on, eventually teaching the viewer to split the inside of a root up if t...

How To: Find the percentage of a number easily

In this arithmetic basics tutorial the author shows how to find the percentage of a number. He says that hundred percentage of number is the same number. He says that if we find the percentage of a number where the percentage is less that 100, then the value of the number reduces. Similarly if we find the percentage of a number where the percentage is more than 100, then the value will be more than the original number. He says that to find the percentage of a number we need to mark a decimal ...

How To: Evaluate fractions containing variables

This video is a great one on learning about evaluating fractions. The voice explains how to first plug in the numbers given for each variable in the fractions. He also explains the importance of simplifying the top and bottom first before simplifying the entire fraction. He also explains ways that would not be helpful in solving the problem and comparing that with the correct way. Then he notes the use of your simple math rules to find the answer. Excellent video for viewers.

How To: Evaluate exponents

Exponents are the times you multiply a number by itself. So 3 to the third power would equal 27. Another example could be 3 to the second would be 9. Any number with an exponent is always multiplied by the same number depending on the power. So this means that 5 to the third power would be 5x5x5, which would equal 125. One thing to remember is that when any number is multiplied by the power of 0, the number always is one.

How To: Find the volume of a swimming pool

In this video, we learn how to find the volume of a swimming pool. To do this, you will first need to find the measurements of all the sides that are on the pool. After this, you will plug in the measurements that you found into the equation to find the volume. This equation is: V=AH, volume= area(height). So, plug in the area and the height to the equation for A and H and then multiply these two together. Once you do this, you will find the answer! Don't forget to label the units on the fina...

How To: Find the equation of a line given 2 points

This tutorial teaches you how to find a mathematical equation of a line given 2 points that exists on the line. The tutorial starts off with 2 points labeled (2,-4) and (3,6). The first step is to determine the slope of the line using the formula given in the tutorial in blue. The slope is then solved as 'm'. Plug the slope and the points into another formula given in green. The tutorial maker provides a tip that one can use x1 and y1 or x2 and y2, however, it must be consistent. After, solve...

How To: Solve rational equations easily

This video revolves around solving rational equations in Algebra 2. When you are given a rational equation, you have to find the greatest common factor and multiply all fractions to get that common factor. If a fraction already has that common factor, then no further step is necessary for that one. Next, you have to multiply all fractions by the greatest common factor to get rid of all denominators. Finally, the remaining equation is simple math and you only need to solve the equation for the...

How To: Find X-bar with the Z-score formula

In this video tutorial it shows you how to find the x-bar by using the Z-score formula. In the beginning of this video the formula is displayed on the right, while the values that you need to plug in are on the left. Once you plug in the values and do the cross multiplying, all you have to do is get x-bar by itself on one side of the equation. This is a simple problem on using the z-score formula to find x-bar, it can help you solve more complex problems in the future.

How To: Evaluate square roots

This is the video about how to evaluate square roots. The square root of a number is a number that you can square to get it, that is, a number that you can multiply by itself to get the number. So, 2 is a square root of 4, because 2 x 2 = 4, and 3 is a square root of 9, because 3 x 2 = 9. (-2) x 2 is also 4 and (-3) x 2 is also 9. Numbers that have square roots always have two, a positive one and a negative one, but the square root symbol means only the positive one, so we can have one answer...

How To: Calculate the height and volume of a pyramid

Need to know how to calculate the height and volume of a pyramid in geometry? Learn how with this free video lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Solve an equation with a radical under a radical

In this video the instructor shows how to solve an equation with a radical under a radical. If you have an equation with a square root on both sides, with one of the sides having another inner square root under the original square root, it can be a little tricky to solve it.

How To: Divide decimals

Here we are, learning how to divide decimals. So we are dividing a whole number or a fraction by a fraction. How this presenter does this is by moving the decimal two places to the right on both the top and bottom of the sum. In other words, he multiplies the two numbers by 100. So 2 becomes 200 and .25 becomes 25. So much easier to divide 200 by 25 than to divide 2 by .25. Provided you've multiplied both the top and bottom by the same amount, the result will be the same, because the relative...

How To: Find a missing side of a triangle, similar to another

In this tutorial the author shows how to find out the missing side of a triangle which is similar to an other triangle. He explains the concept of similar triangle using diagrams and by showing that similar triangles have equal corresponding angles and parallel sides. Now he labels sides of similar triangles and intends to find out the length of unknown side. Now in similar triangles, as the lengths of sides are proportionate he shows how to write a equation of proportion and solve it finding...

How To: Calculate weight if given the mass

The video shows how to calculate weight if the mass is given and vice versa.Later on in this unit you will learn about Newton's laws of motion and Newton's second law of motion gives us a way to change mass into weight and vice versa.This law will tell you what is happening to objects when the net force on the object is not equal to zero and the easy way to say what will happen is that the object will accelerate.But how much the object accelerates depends on two things,firstly the mass of the...

How To: Prove Rank(A) = Rank(transpose of A) in linear algebra

Learn how to prove that the rank of a matrix, A, is equal to the rank of its transpose in linear algebra. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Translate a shape

Learn how to translate shapes with a few simple steps. - First step: Find the new verticals under the transformation which are T3,2. Values are A=(-5,-8), B=(-3,-4), C=(-8,-3), D=(-6,1). Find the points of the verticals on the graph and connect the points one by one until you can get one shape.

How To: Use derivatives to find slope in calculus

Need help figuring out how to work with derivatives in calculus? From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to use derivatives to f...

How To: Simplify radicals which are not perfect squares

Need help reducing radical expressions without perfect square or cube roots? Take heart: this free math lesson will ensure that you know everything you need to know for that next big test. Examples include square roots, cube roots, and 4th roots. You'll also learn a technique to simplify n-root expressions as well as how to simplify variables in radical expressions.

How To: Find the surface area of a rectangular prism quickly

Do you need help in math? Unable to calculate the surface area of a rectangular prism? This video helps you understand how to calculate the surface area of a rectangular prism. By showing each step required to calculate the surface area of a prism and a detailed explanation of each step, anyone will be able to learn how to successfully calculate the surface area of a rectangular prism. By the end of the video, you can also calculate the surface area of a rectangular prism.

How To: Interpret a standard deviation

A rough definition of standard deviation is that it is a measure of expressing the observed variations about the average in statistical data i.e. by how much do the observed values vary from the mean. This video continues from the previous solved example and demonstrates the mathematical interpretation of the standard deviation that was calculated. We begin with stating the mean and standard deviation values and then calculating the upper and lower bounds of the data based on the standard dev...

How To: Use and find x & y-intercepts in algebra

A straight line can be represented in the form of a liner equation containing two variables x and y. When the equation is graphed on a pair of coordinate axes, the line passes cut through the axes in two points. The point where the line cuts the x-axes is called as its x coordinate and the point where the line cuts the y-axes is called as its y coordinate. In this way a line has x-intercept and y-intercept. The x-intercept of a line lies on x axes and is in the form (a,0). Similarly the y-int...

How To: Multiply Any Number by 11 with a Super Fast Mental Trick

Most of the time, when I’m bored during math class, I play with my calculator to satisfy my boredom. Recently, I've discovered that when multiplying any number by 11, 111, or any number similar to it, that it has a pattern (though I guess everything in math has a pattern). I don't know if this technique is original, because I didn't read anything about this. It's just mere observation. If it’s a tried and true technique, let me know.

How To: Write a logarithm as a sum or difference of logarithms

This video shows the method to write a logarithm as a sum or difference of logarithms. The square root of the term given is taken out as half according to the rule. Then the numerator and denominator is divided into product of factors. This is broken into the difference of numerator and denominator according to the rule. Finally, the product of factors is expressed as the sum of factors. Now we see the domain of the term. As the term is a square root of the term it should be greater than zero...